Documentation for PISM, a parallel Ice Sheet Model

a list of all "PISM Applications of the Month"

Since September 2011 we have featured one PISM application per month, either a published article or a presented poster, on the home page. This is the archive. Also see the list of publications on applications of PISM.

Please let us know if you would like your work to appear as a PISM Application of the Month.

April 2014

 EGU Outstanding Student Poster (OSP) Awards 2013

Click the image to go to the EGU Outstanding Student Poster (OSP) Awards 2013 page.

Paleo-glaciations of the Shaluli Shan, southeastern Tibetan Plateau
investigators: Fu, P. and 7 others
conference: EGU Annual Meeting, Vienna, Austria, April 07-12, 2013

Geomorphological mapping, 10Be and 26Al exposure dating and glacial modeling are used to reconstruct the glacial history of the Shaluli Shan, southeastern Tibetan Plateau, and to understand the evolution of the glacial landscape. The Haizishan Plateau experienced multiple ice cap glaciations, and 10Be and 26Al exposure ages from bedrock, boulder and saprolite profile samples show limited glacial erosion on some parts of the plateau surface and more than 2 meters of bedrock erosion in other areas. This juxtaposition of high erosion and relict topography suggests that the paleo Haizishan ice cap had a complex basal thermal regime. A numerical glacier model (PISM) is now being used to investigate the thermal regime of the paleo ice cap and patterns of erosion potential. This work provides new insights into the paleoclimatic setting and glacial landscape evolution of the southeast Tibetan Plateau.

2014/04/01 08:52 · Constantine Khroulev

March 2014

Click the image to go to the Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology page.

Mountain building and the initiation of the Greenland Ice Sheet
investigators: A. Solgaard, J. Bonow, P. Langen, P. Japsen, and C. Hvidberg
journal: Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology

In this paper, effects of a new hypothesis about mountain building in Greenland on ice sheet initiation are investigated using PISM in combination with a climate model. According to this hypothesis, low-relief landscapes near sea level characterized Greenland in the Miocene. Then two phases of km-scale uplift, beginning at 10 and ~5 Ma, respectively, initiated the formation of the present-day mountains. These results are consistent with the observed climatic variability superimposed on the general cooling trend in the late Cenozoic, and they indicate that the Greenland Ice Sheet of today is a relict formed under colder conditions. The late Cenozoic mountain building in Greenland augments the effects of the climatic deterioration leading to the Northern Hemisphere glaciations. Without the second phase of uplift, the Greenland Ice Sheet would have been more sensitive to the changes in climate over the past millions of years.

2014/03/04 12:50 · Constantine Khroulev

February 2014

Click the image to go to the Quaternary Science Reviews page.

Glaciology and geological signature of the Last Glacial Maximum Antarctic ice sheet
investigators: N. Golledge and 12 others
journal: Quaternary Science Reviews

Continent-wide marine and terrestrial geological evidence constrains the dynamical configuration of the Antarctic ice sheet during the last, and possibly preceding, glacial maxima. This paper interprets results from a remarkably high-resolution (5 km) PISM model using this evidence, focussing on the basal thermal regime of the ice sheet, its flow pattern, variability in subglacial erosion and sediment transport, and how these characteristics evolve during glacial transitions. The results show that rapid basal sliding in discrete outlets eroded and advected sediment to the continental shelf primarily during the early stages of advance and retreat of the ice sheet. Sector-by-sector analysis of geologic constraints, exquisite figures showing sediment transport paths through tight geographic confinements, and careful consideration of peak erosion timing set a new standard for validating high-resolution time-dependent model results with extensive geophysical evidence.

2014/02/02 10:48 · Ed Bueler

January 2014

Click the image to go to the GRL page.

An open ocean region in Neoproterozoic glaciations would have to be narrow to allow equatorial ice sheets
investigators: C. Rodehacke, A. Voigt, F. Ziemen, D. Abbot
journal: Geophysical Research Letters

A major goal of understanding Neoproterozoic glaciations and determining their effect on the evolution of life and Earth's atmosphere is establishing whether and how much open ocean there was during them. Geological evidence tells us that continental ice sheets had to flow into the ocean near the equator during these glaciations. Here we drive the PISM ice sheet model with output from four simulations of the ECHAM5/MPI-OM atmosphere-ocean general circulation model with successively narrower open ocean regions. We find that extensive equatorial ice sheets form on marine margins if sea ice extends to within about 20 degrees latitude of the equator or less (Jormungand-like and hard Snowball states), but do not form if there is more open ocean than this. Given uncertainty in topographical reconstruction and ice sheet ablation parameterizations, we perform extensive sensitivity tests to confirm the robustness of our main conclusions.

2013/12/31 08:11 · Ed Bueler

December 2013

Click the image to go to the University of Maine news item.

Increasing the Scalability of PISM for High Resolution Ice Sheet Models
investigators: P. Dickens and T. Morey
journal: Proceedings of the 14th IEEE International Workshop on Parallel and Distributed Scientific and Engineering Computing, May 2013, Boston

In this paper, authors discuss their work in evaluating and increasing the I/O performance of PISM on a state-of-the-art supercomputer by using a 1 km Greenland ice sheet setup. In particular, they found that the computation performed by PISM is highly scalable, but that the I/O demands of the higher-resolution model are a significant drag on overall performance. The paper describes a series of experiments to find the cause of the relatively-poor I/O performance and how such performance could be improved. By making simple changes to the PISM source code and one of the I/O libraries used by PISM authors were able to provide an 8-fold increase in I/O performance.

2013/12/03 07:30 · Constantine Khroulev

November 2013

Click the image to go to the paper at The Cryosphere website

An iterative inverse method to estimate basal topography and initialize ice flow models
investigators: W. van Pelt and others
journal: The Cryosphere

A new inverse approach to reconstruct distributed bedrock topography and simultaneously initialize an ice flow model is proposed. The procedure runs PISM multiple times over a prescribed period, while being forced with space- and time-dependent climate input. After each iteration bed heights are adjusted using information of the remaining misfit between observed and modeled surface topography. Synthetic experiments with constant-climate forcing demonstrate convergence and robustness of the approach. Application to Nordenskiöldbreen, Svalbard, forced with height- and time-dependent climate input since 1300 AD show a high correlation against radar-observed thicknesses. Remaining uncertainties can be ascribed to inaccurate model physics, in particular, uncertainty in the description of sliding.

2013/10/31 11:07 · Ed Bueler

October 2013

Click the image to go to the paper at the J. Geophys. Res. (Earth Surface) website

Insights into spatial sensitivities of ice mass response to environmental change from the SeaRISE ice sheet modeling project II: Greenland
investigators: S. Nowicki and others
journal: J. Geophys. Res. (Earth Surface)

This second paper explores Greenland climate scenarios and forcing experiments from the 31 member Sea-level Response to Ice Sheet Evolution (SeaRISE) project. Although the modeled responses are not always homogeneous, consistent spatial trends emerge from the ensemble analysis, indicating distinct vulnerabilities of the Greenland ice sheet. There are clear response patterns associated with each forcing (1. a change in oceanic condition, 2. a warmer atmospheric environment, and 3. enhanced basal lubrication). Similar mass loss at the whole ice sheet scale will result in different mass losses at the regional scale. All forcings lead to an increased mass loss for the coming centuries, with increased basal lubrication and warmer ocean conditions affecting mainly outlet glaciers, while the impacts of atmospheric forcings affect the whole ice sheet.

Compare the paper describing SeaRISE results for the Antarctic ice sheet.

2013/10/01 14:11 · Ed Bueler

September 2013

Click the image to go to the paper at the J. Geophys. Res. (Earth Surface) website

Insights into spatial sensitivities of ice mass response to environmental change from the SeaRISE ice sheet modeling project I: Antarctica
investigators: S. Nowicki and others
journal: J. Geophys. Res. (Earth Surface)

Antarctic climate scenarios and forcing experiments from the 31 member Sea-level Response to Ice Sheet Evolution (SeaRISE) project are applied to six three-dimensional thermomechanical ice-sheet models, including a PISM model lead by M. Martin at PIK. This paper assesses the century-scale model sensitivity revealed by these experiments. Results indicate (i) growth with warming, except within low-latitude basins (where inland thickening is outpaced by marginal thinning); (ii) mass loss with enhanced sliding (with basins dominated by high driving stresses affected more than basins with low-surface-slope streaming ice); and (iii) mass loss with enhanced ice shelf melting (with changes in West Antarctica dominating the signal due to its marine setting and extensive ice shelves). Ice loss due to dynamic changes associated with enhanced sliding and/or sub-shelf melting exceeds the gain due to increased precipitation. Remaining uncertainties include differences between basins and the impact of sub-shelf melting on ice dynamics.

2013/09/03 09:16 · Ed Bueler

August 2013

Click the image to go to the paper at The Cryosphere.

Hindcasting to measure ice sheet model sensitivity
investigators: A. Aschwanden, G. Aðalgeirsdóttir, and C. Khroulev
journal: The Cryosphere

Validation and assessment of model performance is critical, but it is notoriously-challenging in ice sheet modeling. This paper couples PISM to the HIRHAM5 regional climate model for simulations of the Greenland ice sheet. The results are compared to observations in the 1989-2011 period (hindcasting), in which ice geometry, ice surface velocity, gravitationally-derived mass time-series, and surface elevation change observations are all available. The simulations reproduce the seasonal signal and decadal trends in mass loss but they show deficiencies compared to observed changes in ice discharge. The paper concludes that it is important to use multiple data sets for model validation, and it identifies rates of change of spatially-dense observations as preferred validation metrics.

2013/07/31 00:06 · Ed Bueler

July 2013

Click the image to go to the paper at J. Glaciol.

Grounding-line migration in plan-view marine ice-sheet models: results of the ice2sea MISMIP3d intercomparison
investigators: F. Pattyn and others, including T. Albrecht and M. Huetten
journal: Journal of Glaciology

These are the results of a comparison between plan-view marine ice-sheet models, MISMIP3D. The major experiments use a spatially-varying perturbation in basal sliding parameters. The goal is to model the evolution of curved grounding lines and the corresponding generating buttressing effects. Steady-state grounding-line positions and the degree of reversibility are analyzed. PISM results from PIK authors Albrecht and Huetten, on a 1 km grid using a hybrid-SSA formulation, show the same quality of steady state positions and reversibility as models, often specially-designed for these grounding line geometries, with more complete stress balances.

2013/07/19 11:10 · Ed Bueler

June 2013

Click the image to get the PDF (17.5 MB).

Changing basal conditions during the speed-up of Jakobshavn Isbræ, Greenland
investigators: Marijke Habermann, Martin Truffer, and David Maxwell, University of Alaska Fairbanks
conference: EGU 2013

Here, basal conditions for different years before and after the break-up of the tongue are inferred from surface velocity measurements to investigate the changes and to compare them with parameterizations of basal conditions commonly used in ice-sheet models.

All inversions reproduce the overall pattern of observed surface velocities, which shows that, in general, our data and model choices are capable of reproducing the observations by only adjusting basal yield stress. In the lower 5 km of the glacier a clear trend from higher to lower basal yield stress values is visible.

2013/06/03 12:53 · Andy Aschwanden

May 2013

Click the image to get the PDF (1 MB).

Modelling the outlet glaciers terminating in Godthab fjord
investigators: Antje Fitzner and Dorthe Dahl-Jensen, Centre for Ice and Climate, Copenhagen
conference: IGS 2012 Fairbanks

see the youtube video

Can regional ice dynamics modeling help to understand the mass loss of the Greenland ice sheet through surface melting and flow into outlet glaciers (calving and basal melting), and estimate the fresh water flux into a fjord? This study considers an example, the outlet glaciers terminating in Godthab fjord, including glacier Kangiata Nunaata Sermia. surface mass balance and 2 m air temperature from RACMO and HIRHAM RCM output were

compared. The new PISM “regional” mode, the pismo executable in stable0.5, was applied. The model captures the high velocities near the terminus qualitatively, but even at high 2 km model resolution the distinct fast flowing arms are not well modelled, and the modelled velocities and fluxes are overall lower than than observed. The question remains: Are there are deep troughs in the bed topography where the surface velocity is very high?

2013/05/08 09:59 · Ed Bueler

April 2013

Click the image to get the PDF (4 MB).

Are the simulated climatic and dynamic mass losses of the Greenland Ice Sheet decoupled during the next 100 years?
investigators: Guðfinna Aðalgeirsdóttir and Andy Aschwanden
conference: EGU 2013

Model simulations with the state-of-the-art ice sheet model PISM (Parallel Ice Sheet Model), that is forced with a number of climate forcings for the next century are presented. The climate forcings come from the EU FP7 project ice2sea where 3 regional climate models (HIRHAM5, MAR and HadRM3P) were used to dynamically downscale two scenario runs (A1B and E1) from two GCMs (ECHAM5 and HadCM3). These climate models are run with a constant ice sheet topography and therefore climate-elevation change feedback not included in the simulated mass changes.

To assess the sensitivity of the projections to the ice sheet model initial state, four initialisaton methods were used. Analyses of these 100 years simulations indicate that the mass changes due to climate forcing are decoupled from the changes due to dynamic response and the initialisation procedure. The simulated mass loss has a relatively large range, 0.5 to 6.5 cm sea level rise equivalent, which is to a large extent due to the range in the projected climate forcing from the regional climate models that were used to downscale the climate fields.

2013/04/16 11:37 · Andy Aschwanden

March 2013

Click the image to go to the J Glaciol page.

Ice-sheet model sensitivities to environmental forcing and their use in projecting future sea-level (The SeaRISE Project)
investigators: Robert Bindschadler and 27 others
journal: Journal of Glaciology

Two versions of PISM were among the ten ice sheet models used to study sensitivity of the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets to prescribed changes of surface mass balance, sub-ice-shelf melting and basal sliding. Results exhibit a large range in projected contributions to sea level change. In most cases, the sea-level-relevant ice volume lost is linearly dependent on the strength of the forcing. Combinations of forcings can be closely approximated by linearly summing the contributions from single forcing experiments suggesting that non-linear feedbacks are modest.

Our models indicate that Greenland is more sensitive than Antarctica to likely atmospheric changes in temperature and precipitation, while Antarctica is most sensitive to increased ice-shelf basal melting. An experiment approximating the IPCC’s RCP8.5 scenario produces first century contributions to sea level of 22.3 and 8.1 cm from Greenland and Antarctica, respectively, with a range among models of 62 and 14 cm, respectively. By 200 years, projections increase to 53.2 and 26.7 cm, respectively, with ranges of 79 and 43 cm.

2013/03/04 19:38 · Ed Bueler

February 2013

Click on the thumbnail to get the poster (6 Mb PDF).

LGM ice sheets simulated with a fully coupled ice sheet-climate model
investigators: Florian Ziemen and others
venue: EGU 2012

We interactively couple the atmosphere-ocean-vegetation general circulation model ECHAM5/MPIOM/LPJ with the ice sheet model mPISM, a modified version of the Parallel Ice Sheet Model, without flux correction or anomaly maps in our models. We run ECHAM5 in T31 resolution and mPISM on a 20 km grid covering most of the northern hemisphere. For comparison, we also perform an experiment using the PMIP2 protocol and the ICE-5G ice sheet reconstruction (Peltier, 2004) instead of mPISM. In runs using pre-industrial as well as LGM boundary conditions, the shape of the ice sheets has a strong influence on the wind systems and thereby on the global climate. Our model shows ice sheet collapses as regular part of the ice sheet behavior. These pulses create strong signals in the ocean.

2013/02/05 13:13 · Ed Bueler

January 2013

Click on the thumbnail to go to the Nature site for this paper.

Increased future ice discharge from Antarctica owing to higher snowfall
investigators: Ricarda Winkelmann and others
journal: Nature

Large uncertainties exist in the potential changes of dynamic ice discharge from Antarctica from precipitation. Here we show that snowfall and discharge are not independent, but that future ice discharge will increase by up to three times as a result of additional snowfall under global warming. Our results, based on PISM-PIK runs forced by climate simulations through to the end of 2500, show that enhanced discharge exceeds the effect of surface warming as well as that of basal ice-shelf melting. In an ensemble of simulations designed to capture ice-physics uncertainty, the additional dynamic ice loss along the coastline compensates for between 30 and 65 per cent of the ice gain due to enhanced snowfall over the entire continent. This results in a dynamic ice loss of up to 1.25 metres in the year 2500 for the strongest warming scenario.

2013/01/05 15:37 · Ed Bueler

December 2012

Click on the thumbnail to go to the GRL site for this paper.

Self-inhibiting growth of the Greenland Ice Sheet
investigators: Peter Langen and others
journal: Geophysical Research Letters

The build-up of the Greenland Ice Sheet from ice-free conditions is studied using PISM driven by fields from an atmospheric GCM. Experiments where the two are coupled off-line are augmented by one where an intermediate ice sheet configuration is coupled back to the GCM. The ice sheet regrows from the ice-free state but this is halted when the intermediate recoupling step is included. This inhibition of further growth is due to a Föhn effect of moist air parcels being lifted over the intermediate ice sheet and arriving in the low-lying Greenland interior with high temperatures. This demonstrates that two-way coupling between the atmosphere and the ice sheet is essential for understanding its dynamics. Conditions cooler than those of today may be necessary for the GrIS to regrow to the present volume.

2012/12/03 12:30 · Ed Bueler

November 2012

Click on the thumbnail to go to the Proc. National Academy of Sciences site for this paper.

Dynamics of the Last Glacial Maximum Antarctic ice-sheet and its response to ocean forcing
investigators: Nick Golledge and others
journal: Proc. National Academy of Sciences

Retreat of the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) Antarctic ice sheet is thought to have been initiated by changes in ocean heat and eustatic sea level from northern ice sheets melted under rising atmospheric temperatures. The extent to which spatial variability in ice dynamics may have modulated the resultant pattern and timing of decay of the Antarctic ice sheet has so far received little attention, however. We use a 5-km resolution whole-continent PISM model to assess whether differences in the mechanisms governing ice sheet flow could account for discrepancies between geochronological studies in different parts of the continent. We simulate the geometry and flow characteristics of an equilibrium LGM ice sheet. Then we perturb the system with sea level and ocean heat flux increases to investigate ice-sheet vulnerability. We find that although ocean warming and sea-level rise bring about ocalized glacier acceleration, drawdown of ice from neighboring areas leads to widespread thinning of entire glacier catchments.

2012/10/30 13:03 · Ed Bueler

October 2012

Click on the thumbnail to go to the Climate Dynamics site for this paper.

Linear response functions to project contributions to future sea level
investigators: Ricarda Winkelmann and A. Levermann
journal: Climate Dynamics

Linear response functions can separately estimate the sea-level contributions of thermal expansion and solid ice discharge from Greenland and Antarctica. This formalism introduces a time-dependence which allows for future rates of sea-level rise to be influenced by past climate variations. The linear response function for the solid ice discharge is computed with the Potsdam Parallel Ice Sheet Model PISM-PIK (Winkelmann et al. 2011) under surface warming scenarios. Different from earlier studies we conclude that solid ice discharge from Greenland due to dynamic thinning is bounded by 0.42 m sea-level equivalent. Ice discharge induced by surface warming on Antarctica is best captured by a model which reflects the fact that ice loss increases with the cumulative amount of heat available for softening the ice in our model.

2012/10/02 14:29 · Ed Bueler

September 2012

Click on the thumbnail to go to the Journal of Glaciology site for this paper.

Reconstruction of basal properties in ice sheets using iterative inverse methods
investigators: Marijke Habermann and others
venue: Journal of Glaciology

Inverse methods are used to estimate model parameters from observations, here basal shear stress from the surface velocity of an ice sheet. One starts with an initial estimate of the model parameters and then updates them to improve the match to observations in an iterative process. Large-scale spatial features are adjusted first. A stopping criterion prevents the overfitting of data. In this paper, iterative inverse methods are applied to the shallow-shelf approximation forward model. A new incomplete Gauss–Newton method is introduced and compared to the steepest descent and nonlinear conjugate gradient methods. Two different stopping criteria, the discrepancy principle and a recent-improvement threshold, are compared. The IGN method shows faster convergence than the others. Though PISM is not mentioned by this paper, and the experiments were done in python, code supporting these inversion methods is already present in the PISM dev branch.

2012/09/02 21:22 · Ed Bueler

August 2012

Click on the thumbnail to go to the Quaternary Science Reviews journal site for this paper.

Last Glacial Maximum climate in New Zealand inferred from a modelled Southern Alps icefield
ice sheet: New Zealand (paleo)
investigators: Nick Golledge and others
venue: Quaternary Science Reviews

In an attempt to constrain the climate of the Last Glacial Maximum period (LGM, c. 30–20 ka before present), a simulation of the New Zealand Southern Alps icefield is presented. PISM is applied at 500 m-resolution using empirical glaciological, climatological and geological data specific to the model domain, the entire icefield. An LGM cooling of at least 6–6.5 °C is necessary to bring about valley glaciers that extend beyond the mountains. However, climate–topography thresholds related to the elevation and hypsometry of individual catchments control the gradient of the rate of glacier expansion in the domain. In order to remain within geologically-reconstructed LGM limits we find that the LGM cooling was most likely associated with a precipitation regime up to 25% drier than today.

2012/07/31 10:13 · Ed Bueler

July 2012

Click on the thumbnail to go to the Climate Dynamics journal site for this paper.

Multistability of the Greenland ice sheet and the effects of an adaptive mass balance formulation
ice sheet: Greenland
investigators: Anne M. Solgaard and Peter L. Langen
venue: Climate Dynamics

We use output from a general circulation model (CAM3+CLM) to construct adaptive temperature and precipitation patterns to force PISM off-line, taking into consideration that the patterns change in a non-uniform way, both spatially and temporally, as the geometry of the ice sheet evolves and as climate changes. In a series of experiments we investigate retreat from the present day configuration and build-up from ice free conditions during a warmer-than-present climate. We find that the ice sheet is able to survive and build up at higher temperatures using the more realistic adaptive patterns compared to the classic constant patterns. The ice sheet is multistable at least for certain temperature forcings, so it does not necessarily return to its initial configuration after a temperature excursion.

2012/07/04 20:51 · Ed Bueler

June 2012

Click on the thumbnail to get the PDF from the J. Glaciol. site.

Numerical simulations of cyclic behaviour in the Parallel Ice Sheet Model (PISM)
ice sheet: simplified outlet glaciers
investigators: Ward van Pelt and Johannes Oerlemans
venue: Journal of Glaciology

Numerical experiments are conducted on a synthetic topography with PISM, in which stress balance is connected to evolving thermodynamics and hydrology. The sensitivity of cyclic behaviour to changes in sliding-law parameters and the climate input is studied. Multiple types of oscillations were found, with strong variations in both amplitude and frequency. High-frequency oscillations (period 114–169 years), which are shown to have a major impact on ice velocities and a small effect on the ice volume, are related to variations in the water distribution at the base. Low-frequency cycles (period 1000+ years), which have a major impact on both velocities and ice volume, are linked to changes in the thermal regime.

2012/05/30 13:40 · Ed Bueler

May 2012

Click on the thumbnail to download the PDF (~3Mb).

Kinematic first-order calving law implies potential for abrupt ice-shelf retreat
ice sheet: Antarctic ice shelves
investigators: Anders Levermann and others
venue: The Cryosphere

Observed large-scale disintegration of Antarctic ice shelves has moved their fronts closer towards grounded ice, accelerating ice-sheet discharge and contributing to global sea-level rise. Here we describe the first-order large-scale kinematic contribution to calving which is consistent with large-scale observation. This calving law depends only on local ice properties which are, however, determined by the full topography of the ice shelf. Simulations in PISM-PIK using the parameterization reproduces multiple stable fronts as observed for the Larsen A and B Ice Shelves, including abrupt transitions between them. We also find multiple stable states of the Ross Ice Shelf.

2012/04/30 09:30 · Ed Bueler

April 2012

Click on the thumbnail to get the PDF from the J. Glaciol. site.

An enthalpy formulation for glaciers and ice sheets
ice sheet: Greenland and other ice sheets
investigators: Andreas Aschwanden and others
venue: Journal of Glaciology

Polythermal conditions are ubiquitous among glaciers and ice sheets. Fortunately, temperature and liquid water fraction are functions of a single enthalpy variable: a small enthalpy change in cold ice is a change in temperature, while a small enthalpy change in temperate ice is a change in liquid water fraction. The unified enthalpy formulation described in this paper models the mass and energy balance for the three-dimensional ice fluid, for the surface runoff layer and for the subglacial hydrology layer, together in a single energy-conserving theoretical framework. It is implemented in PISM. Results for the Greenland ice sheet are compared with those from a cold-ice scheme.

2012/03/29 22:54 · Ed Bueler

March 2012

Click on the thumbnail to download the PDF (~1Mb).

Century-scale evolution of the Jakobshavn Isbræ with a high resolution regional model
ice sheet: Greenland
lead investigator: Daniella DellaGiustina
venue: AGU Fall Meeting 2011

A new regional mode in PISM is applied to the Jakobshavn outlet glacier. This mode is best suited for high spatial resolutions (< 1 km) and short timescales (< 1000 a). The first step is the identification of a drainage basin based on the surface gradient. Boundary conditions along the basin outline then partially-isolate the outlet glacier flow from the rest of the ice sheet. The ice dynamics model applied within the basin is the full enthalpy-based, SSA-sliding model. Both slow and fast ice flow are captured, as shown by a comparison to observations.

2012/03/01 10:38 · Ed Bueler

February 2012

Click on the thumbnail to get PDF from the J. Glaciol. site.

Fracture field for large-scale ice dynamics
ice sheet: Antarctic ice sheet
investigators: Torsten Albrecht and Anders Levermann
venue: Journal of Glaciology

A macroscopic fracture-density field is introduced into PISM. Its evolution includes the initiation and growth of fractures as well as their advection with two-dimensional ice flow. To first approximation, fracture growth is assumed to depend on the spreading rate only, while fracture initiation is defined in terms of principal stresses. The inferred fracture-density fields compare well with observed elongate surface structures. The aim of this study is to introduce the field and investigate which of the observed surface structures can be reproduced by the simplest physically motivated fracture source terms.

2012/02/01 00:01 · Ed Bueler

January 2012

Click on the thumbnail to download the PDF (10Mb).

Fine-grid simulation of Antarctic ice stream dynamics at the Last Glacial Maximum
ice sheet: Antarctic ice sheet (LGM)
lead investigator: Nick Golledge
venue: INQUA 2011 and SCAR International Symposium on Antarctic Earth Sciences, 2011

The Antarctic Research Centre is using PISM to study Antarctic ice sheet behaviours during key periods of the past, particularly the LGM and the mid-Pliocene.

2012/01/07 15:07 · Ed Bueler

December 2011

Click on the thumbnail to go to the Nature site.

When glacial giants roll over
ice sheet: Antarctic ice sheet
investigators: Anders Leverman, Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK)
venue: Nature

In a short News & Views article in Nature, Levermann reviews the potential for tsunami-genic iceberg calving as a phenomenon and a possible hazard. PISM-PIK Antarctic ice sheet simulations gave the frequency distribution of iceberg height and energy in discharge events per decade; see box. Iceberg discharge was computed from the vertical extent of the ice sheet and the marginal velocity distribution in a present-day equilibrium state. The results show a peak in the abundance of icebergs with a height of around 400 metres, and a distribution of energies up to several kilotonnes of TNT.

2011/11/30 15:00 · Ed Bueler

November 2011

Click on the thumbnail to go to the J. Glaciol. site.

Snapshots of the Greenland ice sheet configuration in the Pliocene to early Pleistocene
ice sheet: Greenland (paleo) ice sheet
investigators: Anne Solgaard, Centre for Ice and Climate, Denmark, and colleagues
venue: Journal of Glaciology

A study of the extent of the Greenland ice sheet during the Mid-Pliocene Warmth (3.3–3.0 Ma), its advance across the continental shelf during the late Pliocene to early Pleistocene glaciations (3.0–2.4 Ma) as implied by offshore geological studies, and the transition from glacial to interglacial conditions around 2.4 Ma as deduced from the deposits of the Kap København Formation, North Greenland.

2011/10/30 00:18 · Ed Bueler

October 2011

Click on the thumbnail to download the PDF (~3Mb).

Numerical simulations of the Cordilleran ice sheet
ice sheet: Cordilleran (paleo) ice sheet, North America
investigator: Julien Seguinot
venue: INQUA 2011

This poster presents outcomes of step-cooling perturbation from current conditions using the Parallel Ice Sheet Model (PISM).

These simplified first experiments clearly demonstrate that ice sheet nucleation centers are consistent with the geological record. This as an encouraging start towards increased model complexity (ice shelves, lithospheric rebound) and transient model runs using past temperature and sea level reconstructions.

2011/09/30 12:06 · Ed Bueler

September 2011

Click on the thumbnail to download the PDF (~3Mb).

The Potsdam Parallel Ice Sheet Model (PISM-PIK) – Part 2: Dynamic equilibrium simulation of the Antarctic ice sheet
ice sheet: Antarctic ice sheet
investigators: Maria Martin, Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research, and colleagues
venue: The Cryosphere

This paper presents a dynamic equilibrium simulation of the ice sheet-shelf system on Antarctica with the Potsdam Parallel Ice Sheet Model (PISM-PIK) with a focus on the Ronne-Filchner and Ross ice shelf areas as well as on the whole ice-sheet system.

PISM-PIK (and now PISM) allows free movement of grounding lines and calving fronts thanks to a physically-motivated calving law based on horizontal spreading rates and an implementation of a calving-front stress boundary condition.

The results support the approach of superposition of SIA and SSA for the representation of fast motion of grounded ice.

2011/09/19 19:38 · Constantine Khroulev
old_paotm.txt · Last modified: 2014/01/31 15:33 by Ed Bueler
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